Wednesday, November 28, 2012

My Great Grandfather's Tackle Box

Going through his mother's garage my father came across his grandfathers tackle box. He brought it home and gave it to me figuring I would be interested in it. I don't think I have ever even seen a picture of my great grandfather. I have heard a few stories about his love of juicy fruit and how he made his grandchildren stein the creek for minnows to fry up. Everything appears to be from the early 50s, and it is all pretty interesting (at least to a fishing fanatic like me). 
Here it is a brown Sport King locking tackle box.
2 drawers and plenty of room inside. There was some old newspapers that did not appear to be anything other than to wick away moisture. There was also a Hedden spinning reel, a fillet knife, a rusty metal fish stringer and some half melted flies. 
From what I understand this Jaleoxe reel made between 1939 and 1950 and manufactured in Bronson, Michigan.
I wonder how many muskies the old man caught with this. 
Next up is a Copper Circle spoon made by  Canadian Baits Inc. of Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
At first I thought it was some king of dodger for trolling. There was a large J hook in the box that I thought went to something else until I started doing some research on the lure. From what I read this lure claimed to catch: Northern Pike, Musky, Black Bass, Walleye and Lake Trout. I wonder if my great grandfather ever caught anything on it. 
He also had a ton of spoons. I am not sure if Daredevil marked their lures back then or if they are imitations. The large chrome one is a KB spoon made in Superior, Wisconsin some time around the early 50s. They all seem to have some wear and tear like they got some use. 
He also had some bait harnesses and a few inline spinners, I bet that spinner adds a lot of action to a lure, today a lot of fishermen seem to be more concerned over the stealth of their fishing line is than how much flash or vibration their lure has. 
This last ite, really threw my wife and I for a loop. Is it a Whistle? Does it make a sound? Is it a swivel weight? Nope, a internet search of the patent number proved this is a fishing bait quick release. You attach one end to your line and the other to your lure. When the fish takes the bait it pulls and drops the weight leaving you to fight the fish. With the cost of lead these days, this would be a hard sell on today's market. The patent was applied for in 1946 and granted in 1948. 
I was never able to meet the man, but I know a little more about him. It is amazing how far fishing technology has and hasn't come in the 60 or so years since these items were manufactured. I wanted to know more about these items, not what they are worth. The sad thing is a majority of the web pages brought up in searching for info on these items were auction sites. I only found a hand full of sites with any real information about the products.

This stuff is history and should be preserved, not for a cash value but for its cultural value. If anyone reading this has any more information or sites with more information about these items, don't it hold back, share it with me.

Thanks for reading,
Dan

Active Duty? Visit All the National Parks for Free!

Being prior Active duty I like to look out for our service members and guide them when I can.

Naval Aviation Station Lemoore has a horrible reputation for being in the middle of nowhere, far form what young Sailors and Marines look for in a permanent duty station. It is avoided by those aware of it's existence and cursed at by those obligated to serve . Drive 40 miles in any direction and all you will see is farm land and cattle lots. The base is small, the valley is hot during the summer and foggy during the winter. There is not a lot for a city fella to do in a one horse town like Lemoore or Hanford.

What is great about the base is what many dread, it's , location. It sits dead smack in the middle of California's San  Joaquin Valley. Forty Five minutes from Fresno, CA, and 90 minutes from Bakersfield where you can catch about any band you would want to see on tour. A two hour drive west to Morro bay where one can do some saltwater fishing, sightseeing, whale watching, surfing or eat fresh caught sea food. An hour south is Pismo beach and an hour north is Big Sur; keep driving north and you hit Monterrey, CA. If you drive east you head into the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the base is an hour away from Sequoia National Park, an hour and a half from Kings Canyon and 2 hours from Yosemite.

I just found out as of May 12th 2012 Active Duty Military members and their families qualify for a free Annual National Parks Pass.  The pass costs $80 for a civilian and gets you in to any National Park. I would have jumped all over that when I was on Active Duty. If you know a service member that enjoys the outdoors pass it on.





Thanks for reading,
Dan

Click the link for more information.
http://www.nps.gov/hove/parknews/news051812.htm

San Simeon Pier Fishing

I really wanted the girls to get in on some fish so I decided to hit the coast this weekend, it worked out because my wife had homework to do, so we had all day. The plan was to leave the house at 5 am and head to San Simeon until around noon. then we would head to Cayucos for lunch and spend the rest of the day there. When I woke up at 4:30 the girls were both anxiously waiting in the living room. The said they had been up since 1 because they were too excited to sleep. Maybe there is some hope for this generation?

We hopped in the car and headed out into the thich Tule fog, it was so thick I was startled by a car parked on the side of the road. It just appeared 20 feet enfront of me and was enough to make me jump in my seat. The fog lifted by the time we hit Rt 41, but did not dissappear completely. We got to San Simeon pier around 730 and my oldest had her first fish on by 0745, a Barred Surf Perch.
My daughter with her Surf Perch
She caught another before I could get my line back in the water and by 0800 she caught a nice sized Jack smelt. I really like the colors these guys have in person, silver sides, a dark green tint on their backs and an electric blue stripe running down their sides. I wish it would show in photos better.

Pacific Jack Smelt
My younger daughter was fuming, the last trip she caught most the fish and here she is getting showed up. She made me change her rig to a feathered Sabiki and got back to fishing.
Standing on the pipe to get over the rail
A few more casts and she was on her first fish, a nice little Surf Perch.
Surf Perch
We continued fishing and cathing up until the tide went out around 1030 and the bite stopped. We kekept at it with no bites until Noon when hunger over took us. We drove down to Cayucos adn grabbed a bite to eat. The wind was much strongerthan it was at San Simeon but we tried any way. 3 casts adn 2 tangles later we decided to go back to San Simeon for the day. The point really helped block the wind and made it possable to cast easier.

Low low tide. 

We fished for a few more hours getting not as much as a nibble, The surf was steady but the tide was still low. I tried to cast my rig towards the kelp bed and would have made it if I didn't run out of line. I was watching my rig fly out after the perfect cast, then suddenly it stopped and dropped. This was followed by a small crack as the knot tied to my spool broke, the line shot past the last eyelet, and it was gone. I think I might have to pick up a slightly larger reel... Maybe.

My oldest and I kept it up into the evening, my youngest played in the surf andcollected crabs and mussels to show us.  

Our little crab friend
The sun set and it was time to go home, we had some fish and got to spend some quality time togeather. I really hope we get to do it again soon.

Sunset on San Simeon Pier
Thanks for reading,
Dan

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

"Carp" Diem on the Kings River

I got out on the river around 6:30 AM, it was cold and the fog was not as bad as it was near my house. I  drove down to the bank, unloaded the kayak and was on the water quickly. I parked close because I forgot my wading boots and did not want to risk stepping on a goat-head with my neoprene wader stockings. I was glad to get out on the water because I hadn't fished the Kings in almost a month with school, work and kids taking up all my time.

The morning started slow, and the rest of the day stayed slow. I lost 2 fish in the first half hour and the bite stopped. I heard flapping coming from the north and when I looked up, I could hardly believe what I saw. There had to be a thousand Pelicans flying a hundred feet over me. They were close enough to make out their feathers from where I was sitting. I unscrewed my camera and snapped a shot, but it hardly did the sight justice.
Migrating Pelicans
The rest of the day was slower than slow, I caught one small bass and missed a few. One was pretty good sized, I got to see it when it jumped off the dropshot hook. I switched my lures up several times, but nothing was working. I went back to the dropshot and started plugging the shore again. I cast to a drop off a little too hard and my reel over-ran. I fixed the over run quickly and when I picked the slack back up I felt a weight on the line and set the hook. I fought it for a few short runs, and it was exciting because I thought it was a big ol bass... Until it got closer and I saw orange in the water.
Bonus Carp
I decided that was a sign it was time to call it a day, on the way in I heard my tackle in the back slide and a splash. I turned around just as my box full of lures sank into the river. It actually floated for a few seconds, then it tipped and quickly sunk into a section of river 5 feet deep with a silty bottom. I probed the muck with my paddle hoping to locate it and it was no use. That was $100 (atleast) in lures I just donated to the river gods. It was time to go home.
My Mean Machine
I almost cried, money has been really tight and I can't afford to replace them. The "walk of shame" home was almost unbearable. My wife thought I should go back with a net and try to find it but it was no use.  Hopefully my luck on the river will change, some instant karma would be nice. The hunt for the big bucket mouth continues.

Thanks for reading,
Dan

Friday, November 23, 2012

Cayucos Pier

Happy late Thanksgiving, here is a late fishing report.

   The second to the last day my parents were over we headed back to the coast. My mother and wife hit the vineyards in Paso Robles and my dad and I took the girls down to Cayucos for some fishing off the pier. Keeping hooks and bait on the lines of three teens is a feat in its self. I managed the skunk, as did two of my daughters. My dad caught a small sculpin, and one of my daughters caught her first fish ever!
A Pacific Jack Smelt  caught on a Sabiki rig
She actually managed to jig up 3 fish before the sun went down. Her older sister was pretty frustrated getting skunked. I gutted and scaled the fish at the small sink on the pier and brought them home. When we got home I kept them in a bag of saltwater over night. The next day I cut the fillets off and cooked them on a hot griddle with lemon, salt, and pepper.
Cayucos Sunset
So proud of my daughter catching her first fish, she is eager for more. Taking them out again Sunday, but I can't decide to go to Sam Simeon or back to Cayucos.   I will be sure to share that trip a little sooner than this one.

Thanks for reading,
Dan

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Virg's Landing in Morro Bay, California

My parents flew out to the cost to visit us, It had been over a year since we saw each other. I had been tempting my old man for almost a year about Lingcod and Rock Fish, it was finally time to get on the water. We booked a 1/2 day trip with Virg's Landing on the only day we could get out. The weather looked good, a slight breeze in the morning slowing down in the afternoon... Someone should fire that weatherman. The day started out nice as we sailed aboard the Black Pearl past Morro Rock.  
Morro Rock
As soon as we got out of the bay the wind started to pick up and the surf swelled. Thirty minutes into the trip a pod of Pacific Dolphins joined us, riding our wake and playing in the waves.

The winds picked up and the captain had trouble holding us one spot and I broke off twice before I could even feel the bottom we were drifting so fast. After loosing my 3rd rig I moved from the port to the starboard side. The Captain made the call to reel up and the girl next to me was having trouble. I saw she had a lot of line out, she looked tired. I asked if I could help, 3 reels in I could tell she had something. Once it got close I handed her rod back and she got the last few cranks on a double hook up. 

The captain brought us shallower but it was no use. The wind was too much, he told us we were going to be rain checked. I was pissed because I thought I was going home skunked. On the ride back in hydraulic fluid started shooting out a port, the deckhands and captain spent 30 minutes messing with it. In that time the wind calmed, the captain told everyone we were going to giver her a go. Within a minute my dad had his first rock fish on a Stankx Tube.    . 
I have been having a lot of luck with the Tubez rigged on a store bought rockcod rig. I  keep getting grief from my fellow fishing addicts for using a store bought rig. The way I figure it, if the rig breaks it was not due to something I did, now that is guilt free fishing.
My dad did pretty well, he caught this nice red off a Bloody Pepper colored Tube rigged on the upper hook on a 0/6 Rock Cod rig with a 10oz weight. We started off needing a full 1lb of lead but as the sea calmed I even managed to feel the bottom at 85 feet with 4oz of weight.
Dad with his first Ling and a nice Red
The captain came through, not a skunk in sight. Even the gulls got their fill with scraps from the crew cleaning fish.
Very grateful the crew stayed out late to make up for some fishing time and that my dad got to catch his first rockfish and Ling. We didn't end up with a full limit but it was still a good haul. I ended up with 5lb 12oz of fillets. Some Blues, a Copper or two, a Star belly, a couple Gophers  plus my dad's big red and 24 inch Ling.
The Haul
I defiantly recommend these guys, hit them up if you get a chance. For more bang for your buck hit up one of their long range trips. I was not paid or discounted for this blog. All opinions expressed are my own, I choose to promote companies in my blog because they are worth it.

Thanks for reading,
Dan

http://www.virgs.com/
http://www.stankxbaitco.com/

Friday, November 16, 2012

The 12 steps of Bass Tackle-aholics.

Are you or is someone you love addicted to Bass Fishing Tackle?

If you answered YES...I am or someone I know is Addicted to Bass Fishing Tackle...Then rest Easy because we are here to help...We want to Help you Tackle your Addiction to Bass Fishing.

The Twelve Steps of Tackle Addiction Recovery:

-Admitted we were powerless over the compulsion to shop for and purchase excessive amounts of fishi...
ng tackle.
-Came to believe and understand that the Bass Tackle Products at LBS Tackle could restore us to sanity.
-Made a decision to Stop Fighting the Urge and give in to such compulsions to shop for and purchase unnecessary amounts of Bass Fishing Tackle.
-Took a searching and fearless inventory of what Bass Fishing Tackle we currently had and what we still needed to completely fill our tackle boxes.
-Admitted to ourselves and publicly the exact nature of our Tackle Addiction.
-Were entirely ready to submit once and for all to our Tackle Addiction.
-Privately committed to shop exclusively at LBS Tackle whenever possible.
-Made a list of all Bass Fishing Tackle we had previously purchased as well as what we still needed.
-Made plans to purchase said Bass Fishing Tackle ASAP, except when to do so would bring harm to ourselves or others.
-Continued to take a Fishing Tackle Inventory and when we needed new tackle promptly shopped for and purchased those items at LBS Tackle.
-Sought through comparison shopping and Bass Fishing research how to improve the organization of our tackle boxes and the power to carry that out.
-Having had a Reality-Check as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other Tackle Addicts, and to practice these principles in all our Bass Fishing Tackle affairs.
 
 
I got this from a friend's Facebook page and felt the need to share. I did not write it but if you know of or are the author send me a message and I'll give you credit where it is due.
 
Thanks for reading, a lot to catch up in the next few days,
Dan