Thursday, May 1, 2014

How to Photograph Your Catch: Part I

Eyes closed, too much flash,
and the only shot I got. 
               While it is not going to help you catch any more fish or get you home safely, knowing how to take a good photo can immortalize your buddy’s big catch. There is nothing worse than getting back home and checking out the days photos and finding a thumb over your big fish of the day, a blurred face, or even worse a completely botched shot. It has happened to all of us. Hand the camera off and take a risk. The only alternative, the dreaded "fish selfie," a move reserved for limited use only to a fishermen alone in the wilderness.

           When taking a picture it is always good to familiarize yourself with the camera you are using, if it is your friend’s, don’t be afraid to take a minute to check to see if the settings are correct and if you got the right shot.  Take off your sunglasses if you can't see the screen. Just getting the fish in the shot is not good enough. The picture to the right is my first Lake Michigan King salmon. The guy, who I met at the marina that day, netted my fish perfectly. But when he took my picture he said got it and I believed him. I learned to ask to see the photo before packing up. 



          Do not center the person in the shot; keep their body to one third of the photo. Using the Auto setting is your best bet in most lighting situations. It is a good idea to ask how your friend wants the picture, once the fish is gone you can‘t retake the photo.  You want to avoid having the sun to your back or your partners back as a general rule. Make sure you check the photo and if you can show them before they let go of the fish. Lastly, make them smile. There are enough pictures of guys looking like they are at funerals with fish; pretend you are having some fun out there. 
          P4130030_edited
         
           If someone else is taking your picture remember it is OK to ask them to get another shot. If you are keeping the fish Time doesn't really matter, but if you are catch and release fishing keep the fish in the water as long as you can. Many fish air-drown while someone is waiting to take a picture of them--so please remember the point of Catch Picture Release (CPR) fishing is to release and preserve the species. 

Thanks for reading,

Dan

Check out the other tips here:

Camera Settings.
http://www.theimpracticalfishermen.com/2014/05/how-to-photograph-your-catch-part-ii.html

11 comments:

  1. Great advice. Thanks for the post, a good reminder, especially for all us bloggers.

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  2. It is important. Pictures catch the readers eye and the writing keeps them coming back. I am confident that good fishing pictures makes more fishermen. Gives the outsiders something to look at and want for themselves.

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    1. Couldn't agree more Daniel, keep up the good work. Love the blog as always.

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  3. Daniel, no way am I an expert at taking pictures. I enjoyed your suggestions and will try to remember them, but often, in the heat of the game a picture is taken and the need to get the fish released becomes a priority. Sometimes, as you know, no second shots. I love really good pictures. Mine usually aren't!

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  4. I just try to practice god habits. I try to get that shot because you never know which fish will be your last in this life. When I go fishing with people their social media profiles normally change that day, so I think I am doing a thing or two right.

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    1. Practicing good habits...not God habits.

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  5. Always a fan of taking a good quality picture people. On the other hand my two regular fishing buddies don't really care as much as I do, but I'm not afraid to tell them before I give them the camera what I want pictured. I, too, believe that good picture taking draws interest.

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    1. It is tough with some people. I have a select few who act the same way, so I just stopped tagging them in the photos. To me taking the pictures is part of the whole thing. We live in a beautiful world. I like having those shots to show it off.

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    2. Right on, man! I much rather take the fishing selfie than hand the camera off to a few of my friends. I now carry one of those small flexible tripods, so, I can do the whole self timer thing if I feel like being in the shot. If I use my phone I can use the forward facing camera and lean it up against something, and just use the voice control to take the shot. Love that feature about the Samsung phones.

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  6. sound advice on taking multiple shots, cant tell you how many it takes for me to get a shot i like

    one out of ten maybe

    kudos Navyfisher ;)

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    Replies
    1. The more you follow the rules of photography and practice the less it takes to get a good shot. You just see them and learn to frame them up naturally.

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